Millennials and the workforce

Posted

7th March 2018

Currently the largest generation in the labour force, millennials can, must and should form an integral part of any recruitment strategy. However, there is little doubt that this considerable portion of the talent pool has vastly different requirements than previous generations. With a far greater understanding of their rights and…

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urrently the largest generation in the labour force, millennials can, must and should form an integral part of any recruitment strategy. However, there is little doubt that this considerable portion of the talent pool has vastly different requirements than previous generations. With a far greater understanding of their rights and far more incentive to jump ship, as it were, they offer a new skill-set, understanding of the market and an entirely modern approach to recruitment.

1. Fluidity
With the average millennial having between 15 and 20 jobs in their lifetime, millennials, in general, don’t stay in one company or at one job for any period of time. This means that in order to attract the most talented candidates it is necessary to adopt a short term strategy, demonstrating what they could achieve in a few years, as they will quite possibly be discouraged to find progress will take a significant period of time.

2. Social Media
LinkedIn’s 2015 Talent Trends Report shows that 62% of millennials visit a company’s social media sites to find out information before applying. In general, they do this to gain a far greater understanding of the company culture and how, they could, potentially slot in. What this means for companies is that they need to be harnessing social media both proactively and reactively. Demonstrating not only their values with campaigns portraying team building days and the like, but also as a recruitment tool and a means of enticing millennials to join their workforce.

3. Company culture
Not only are millennials doing research through social media, but more and more of this employee base hope to see some form of corporate responsibility. Motivated by far more than money alone they want to see a robust company culture whether that’s through volunteer days, flexi-working or parental leave; millennials have a greater understanding of their rights and want to see that companies are forward thinking and in line with the general market shift towards more responsive working practice.

4. Technology
Born into an age that saw the development of the internet, mobile phone and the rapid acceleration of technology, millennials expect their companies to integrate this right across from the board. What this means is practical terms is that they expect to see software that is intuitive, responsive and reactive and that helps streamline their job and make them so much more effective. A Cisco study (https://blogs.cisco.com/ciscoit/new-cisco-study-finds-that-millennials’-workplace-demands-for-flexibility-rivals-pay) found that more than half of millennials wouldn’t accept a job from a company that bans social media, which is an interesting point to consider.

5. Support
Last but by no means least is support. Ensuring staff have the right level of managerial encouragement and assistance is, genuinely, a requirement right across the board. Naturally, millennials are no exception in needing a clear line manager who is able to offer advice, support and feedback. Quite possibly the most integral part of any successful employment; having that right level of nurture and training is the best possible way of not only hiring millennials, but retaining them.